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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
and partners such as singapore and the philippines and expanding our dialogue in exchanges with china. we are also an handed our presence and capabilities in the region. that includes -- expanding our presence and capabilities in the region. that includes allocating our naval fleet to have a 60/40 split between the pacific and atlantic oceans, increasing army and marine presence in the region. locating our most advanced aircraft in the pacific, including new deployments of f- 22's and the mv22's to japan. and lay the groundwork for the first overseas deployment of the f-35 joint strike fighter. the third element of our strategy is that as we do force projection in the asia-pacific and middle east, we still have to maintain our global leadership and presence by building innovative partnerships and partner capacity across the globe and using these innovative rotational deployment as a way to do exercises and training with other countries, developing their capabilities so they can provide for their own security. in latin america, africa, europe, and elsewhere. the past decade of war has rein
conference the next day, i was asked would i not fear this would lead to military clash with china. i said, i was not concerned of that. and when asked why, i said, i think, well, because we have the best damn navy in the world. this was not an extravagant or hyper bolic statement t. was simply a statement of fact. it was a fact that not only i knew. it was a fact which other nations understood. even one carrier battle group had more military fire power than any other nation's entire navy, and we had two of them on the way to taiwan. so, i was confident that no one was going to challenge the fleet that we were sending there. this -- and in fact, they did not challenge it even before our two carrier battle ships arrived in taiwan, the crisis was over and the maneuvers had been subsided. this positive result was possible because of the military capability of our navy and because both carrier battle groups were battle ready and able to steam towards their destination in less than 24 hours. so, why were we able to respond so effectively? certainly one important reason, because the technology in
for the group. he was promoted second-in-command earlier this year. >>> back to the economy now, china apparently going on an american spending spree. a chinese company agreed to buy a big chunk of insurance giant aig for more than $4 billion after the company got a huge bailout during the u.s. financial crisis. that is not the only bargain that china is picking up from u.s. taxpayers lately. stuart varney on this morning, head of "varney & company" on fox business network. good morning, stuart. good to see you. >> good morning, martha. martha: they're gobbling up our assets in many ways . what do you make of it. >> they are spending the money they have got buying american assets cheap. you mentioned aig. a chinese company is paying $4 billion for aig's plane leasing business. aig remember got $189 billion as a bailout fund that was back in september of 2008. the taxpayers still are the largest shareholder in aig. we sold the plane leasing business to china cheap. second item, a 123 batteries, americans taxpayers gave that company $249 million in grants and another 250 million in tax s
'm with the world journal. could you address growing chinese assertiveness in south china sea and east china sea? and given china just announced they will intercept the ship's that go into territorial waters. so are you going to participate in upcoming defense talks with chinese? and what message do you want to tell them? thank you. >> well, thank you for that question. of course the issues that are being placed today in a south china sea and other areas in the north and central, east asia, i think are quite complicated because of the nature of the territorial disputes, some of them historic, some of them now driven by the need for access to resources in those areas, and that's i think to some degree has motivated some of the activities that you see, seeing there. the u.s. position as you know is that we don't take sides on territorial disputes. there's many of those around the globe, not just in the south china sea. but we do want them resolve peacefully, without coercion. and that we call on all the parties there, including the chinese, to ensure that as they approach these problems that they
.n. security resolutions. he also talked about china's decision to the aircraft carrier in the obama administration shifted À la terry resources for the pacific region. this is a half-hour. >> well, good morning and allow hot. i am glad to be here to talk to you about the pacific command, where we are today to where we see ourselves heading in the future. since the last time i was here, we continue to move forward on the rebalanced initiative after as directed by president obama. the rebalanced rows on the strengths of the entire u.s. government, including policy, diplomacy, trade and of course security and that the area i work in. for me, the rebalanced has been and continues to be the strength of the relationships, adjusting our military posture and presents and employ new capacities to ensure we continue to effectively and efficiently contribute to the stability of the asia-pacific as we protect u.s. national interests. of course the keys to success of the innovative access agreement, greatly increased exercises, rotational presence increases come efficient force posture in yeste
to pyongyang. press articles hail the fact that china in anticipation of the recent launch had begun inspecting cargo on north korean ships in search of contraband. the question this raises is why has chi gnat not been inspecting north korean ships since 2006 as called for in a u.n. resolution, reinforced by another resolution in 2009. if u.n. member states would only enforce the sanctions currently on the books, north korea would be unable to ignore the swer national community and the civilized world. the time for coordinated international action is now. the time, in fact, is long overdue. with that, mr. speakering i reserve the balance of our time. the speaker pro tempore: the squom from florida reserves. the gentleman from california, mr. berman is recognized. mr. berman: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise in strong support of h.con.res. 145 as amended and yield myself such time as i may consume. sproy the gentleman is recognized. mr. berman: i would like to thank the sponsor of this legislation, ms. ros-lehtinen, for her leadership on this issue and her work in addressing the north korean threa
.n. security council. it's likely china will try to water down those provisions but it's also certain that the provisions will pass. >> you don't think china will try to veto it? >> i don't think they will veto it. they don't want north korea doing this. >> china is the only ally that they really have. i wonder, do you think it's possible they didn't inform china in advance of the timing of this launch? >> it's possible they did not. people now suspect that the information that we had that north korea was moving its rocket, something was wrong with it, was it an intentional deceptive move? they thought there would be attempts to shoot it down. they wanted to fool japan. they succeeded. >> and it certainly does strengthen the new young leader kim jong-un domestically. >> absolutely. they have been trying since 1998 to launch a long-range missile and they failed in the previous four attempts. they succeeded in this. it's not a rocket that can deliver a major warhead. there are marriajor hurdles to >> they have done in north korea where a lot of people are starving what south korea has b
a satellite into orbit. its neighbors are unnerved. even china expressed regret at the move. the obama administration condemned it as a provocative act and will likely ask the u.n. security council to impose crippling sanctions. the pentagon following developments this morning. chris lawrence there. what do you know, chris? >> right now, officials say that object that north korea put into orbit, monitoring it, analyzing it, but they confirm it is in orbit. why is that important? the same technology you would use to put into orbit is the same technology you use to develop long-range ballistic missiles, the u.s. condemned this act. they are worried about the marriage of north korea's nuclear weapons with this long-range missile technology. this is the type of missile that if it was successful, as it appears to be, could reach parts of the united states, alaska, u.s. military bases in hawaii. but a u.s. efficiently i spoke with who used to work on north north korea for the defense department told me, there are still areas in which north korea has not made it as far as they would need to i
it over the last 8 years is to take out a credit card from the bank of china in the name of our children, driving up our national debt from $5 trillion from the first 42 presidents, number 43 ed a $4 trillion by his lonesome so we now have over $9 trillion of debt that we're going to have to pay back. $30,000 for every man, woman and child. that's irresponsible. it's unpatriotic. >> so, unpatriotic. >> the hypocrite in chief says in 2008 that 5 from is unpatriotic but now we're up to $16.4 trillion. that's okay. by the way we move my credit card limits. he doesn't want a debt ceiling going forward. >> debt ceiling no more can congress deal when the president says we're going to raise the debt ceiling. no squabbles back and forth. >> let me get this straight. borrow $4.8 billion a day and now we're coming to the edge ever the fiscal cliff. republicans are saying hey, let's continue the bush tax cuts, let's make this fair for everyone but let's stop spending. we are spending more than we have. democrats are saying now they are saying it doesn't matter, we are not focused on the deficit any
? the chinese and russians don't help us on sanctions. they have been ineffective because china that dan. you know, when you look at it, everything that we have tried after the bush years has been a failure. now, during the bush years in the early part of that administration, it puts real financial squeeze on the regime. but then they drop it because they have this fantasy that if we can just sit down one more time with the north koreans, suddenly we will have a deal that will make all this go away. it is not how the world works. the north koreans are getting better each time out launching missiles and setting off nuclear explosions. >> on that note, how realistic do you think it is? and how soon do you think it would be that they would be able to i'm one of these long-range missiles with a nuclear warhead? >> that is the real question. this last missile test was real important because it showed that they were successful. they got it up into the atmosphere. it can go a long way to the united states. now, if they perfect nuclear explosions and start miniaturizing it, being able to put it on a
] how can power consumption in china, impact wool exports from new zealand, textile production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. >>> welcome back to squawk. happy monday. today in the "wall street journal" suggesting netflix could end up doomed with its success with children. netflix just for kids get more popular. companies like viacom get accurate. companies provide netflix with most of its content in a kids' focused section. the journal says at some point the suppliers will probably want to charge netflix more or they might even stop selling to netflix. that's been a huge problem for them when it comes to contend more broadly. >> time for the global markets report. kelly evans standing by in london. you rise above over
china will go grow as fast. then you have the united states uncertainty. suddenly they pull back. and then they don't know the personal tax grow, and they pull back. so what i try to talk more about is what our clients see than what we see. because what i think we add value, we see 30,000 market companies in the country and by hearing from them, we can help arctic could you what the what they're seeing and how they're behaving. >> that is one of his huge concerns that at this point, it's too late to save anything with 2013 blaurly for small businesses and their plans in terms of hiring. for 2014, you could be tinkering with that at that point if this pushes in to 2013. and take's that's the biggest t took away. we're really threatening 2014, too. >> i haven't heard so much that about the fiscal cliff. >> it was not just the fiscal cliff, it was time after time, the start of the debt ceiling talks and then they get pushed off, these are temporary fixes and it keeps coming. >> i guess one of the things that we kind of focus on is what happens after the fiscal cliff. because that ju
. let's look at the rankings to see where the u.s. falls and south korea falls. coming in first in china, south korea, then finland and an u.s.a. number 24. math is similar: >> cenk: we're number one. >> now similar story again when it comes to science: >> that in in a's really kicking our ass. >> cenk: that would be another segment. >> cenk: number one. >> now barack obama has been on the record saying really great things about the educational system in south korea. let's take a look. >> our children, listen to this, our children spend over a month less in school than children in south korea every year. that's no way to prepare them for a 21st century economy. >> well, he's right. if you look at the number, south korea spends 220 days a year in class, in the u.s., 180 days per year. in finland it's 190. with south korea and finland you have two opposite ends of the spectrum. turns out both work. we can have a discussion as to what's better, but whatever the u.s. is doing that's not working. when it comes to education funding in korea basically it's the number one in family spending on p
so? >> people on his team wanted him to use nuclear weapons against china and -- vietnam. admiral ratford wanted to nuke -- >> how would you nuke in a jungle? >> it's called tactical nuclear weapons. eisenhower threatened to use them. he was good at bluffing. >> is that how he ended korea? >> historians tackled this and -- >> by the way -- >> threatening something worse? >> well, that's what they say. i want to congratulate him, by the way, on this book. i've really enjoyed it, evan. we had talked about it earlier. this is a -- this bluff that you cover in the eisenhower years is a really critical part of the story of that era. it's also a bluff that, in all fairness, condition continues into the kennedy years. the cuban missile years involved the same kind of stakes that happened in berlin and in korea, indochina. eisenhower was a wartime commander and he understood the difficulties in dealing with the soviets but because he commanded the western front in world war ii, he also understood the possibilities for rough or fundamental, i would say, co-existence or cooperation with the
kim three seems to can consolidate his power. we are waiting to see if this affects china and their soup harris: you mentioned the evidence that south korea has found that the north will be able to fire at us, at our mainland, possibly come in the next two years. is there anything the south is doing at this point? people are feeling imminent danger. >> the south issued that warning about the capability about the missile tests. there is concern about the region, but it is very difficult to stop anything like that. we have some kind of missile patriots in different types of missiles to try to stop that. but it is very difficult if you have a three stage rocket to be able to bring that down very easily. but we did see before that last test that south korea and japanese and american forces were put on alert. perhaps bring you down and casey came came into their territory. back to you. harris: david pifer reporting live today from bangkok. jon: the fiscal cliff is a sport is a way. looking beyond the deadline, short-term battle will have a long-term political impact. let's talk
it will consider an appropriate response. but china, north korea's biggest ally, says a moderate response is needed to avoid further escalation. >>> and software pioneer john mcafee is back in the u.s. after being deported from guatemala. he arrived in miami last night and went to an upscale hotel. it's not clear what if any legal issues he faces in the states. officials in belize want to question him in connection with the murder of a neighbor. so this confusing and bizarre story continues. >> indeed. >>> this could be the biggest news story of the day. the announcement that so many of us, and i put myself in this category, the directionally challenged. this is the news we have been waiting for. here we go. google maps is back for apple's iphone 5. the new google maps app for the iphone was released last night. it comes out three months after apple replaced google maps with its own mapping technology. as many of us know, that was a complete disaster. as we have reported. so now google maps are back on the iphone. it was so bad, apple axed two of their executives because that software was so bad. s
whining in 2006 when the republicans passed the free- trade deal with china that lost millions of jobs. you sound like you work for the defense department or something, or defense contractors. host: sorry about that. guest: you made a lot of good points. if you look at this, the defense industry has been a huge lobbyist on capitol hill. companies like lockheed martin been contributed -- contiguous to representatives. -- being contributors to representatives. i do not think anybody is arguing that there should not be cuts to defense or the pentagon. most people who serve on the house or senate armed services committee are about getting rid of these inefficiencies. the real question is, how do you do it in a safe, responsible way as opposed to having this trigger at the first of the year of the forces and across the broad -- across the board cut that does not have any discretion. there are potential issues that could be on the chopping block. host: market is our next caller on our line for republicans. -- mark is our next caller on our line for republicans. you are on the line with juana
it -- and partners such as singapore and the philippines and expanding our dialogue and -- in exchanges with china. we are also an handed our presence and capabilities in the region. that includes -- expanding our presence and capabilities in the region. that includes allocating our naval fleet to have a 60/40 s plit between the pacific and atlantic oceans, increasing army and marine presence in the region. locating our most advanced aircraft in the pacific, including new deployments of f- 22's and the mv22's to japan. and lay the groundwork for the first overseas deployment of the f-35 joint strike fighter. the third element of our strategy is that as we do force projection in the asia-pacific and middle east, we still have to maintain our global leadership and presence by building innovative partnerships and partner capacity across the globe and using these innovative rotational deployment as a way to do exercises and training with other countries, developing their capabilities so they can provide for their own security. in latin america, africa, europe, and elsewhere. the past decade of war has
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)